This Day

mamalaz:

Mirror of Erised Merlin AU

While Merlin is a Professor at Hogwarts, he visits Arthur every night, even if it is only an image of him in a mirror.

(via fiyaah)

tiny-librarian:

Royal Birthdays for Today, April 14th:

Philip III, King of Spain 1578

Momozono, Emperor of Japan, 1741

Marie of Saxe-Altenburg, Queen of Hanover, 1818

Beatrice of the United Kingdom, British Princess, 1857

todayinhistory:

April 14th 1759: Handel dies

On this day in 1759, the German composer George Frederic Handel died aged 74. Famous for his Baroque pieces, Handel was born in Germany in 1685 but moved to Britain later in life. He gained a reputation there for his Italian operas, and some of his works were performed for Queen Anne and her successors on the British throne. Handel enjoyed royal patronage, and his music is regularly played at royal coronations even to this day. However he is perhaps best known for his biblical choral masterpiece: Messiah. Handel died in 1759, and was honoured with a state funeral and burial in Westminster Abbey. Alongside his grave is a monument, sculpted by Louis Francois Roubiliac, which was unveiled in 1762 and features a statue of Handel which supposedly has the exact likeness of his death mask.

tiny-librarian:

Happy 55th wedding anniversary today to Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko. They were married on this day, April 10th, in 1959, and Michiko is the first “commoner” to ever marry into the Japanese Imperial Family.

tiny-librarian:

Happy 55th wedding anniversary today to Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko. They were married on this day, April 10th, in 1959, and Michiko is the first “commoner” to ever marry into the Japanese Imperial Family.

tiny-librarian:

Archduke Joseph Franz Leopold of Austria, born on this day, April 9th, in 1799. He was the seventh child and second son born to Francis II and Maria Theresa of Naples and Sicily.

british-history:

The Coronation of Henry V
9 April 1413
King Henry V of England was crowned in a ceremony at Westminster, on this day in British history, 9 April 1413. The coronation was officiated by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Arundel. The only main details recorded by contemporary chroniclers focus on the bad weather–a snowstorm–and on the food served at the banquet. Because the coronation had taken place on Passion Sunday, and the English monarchs were still Catholic, the only meat served at the banquet was fish.

british-history:

The Coronation of Henry V

9 April 1413

King Henry V of England was crowned in a ceremony at Westminster, on this day in British history, 9 April 1413. The coronation was officiated by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Arundel. The only main details recorded by contemporary chroniclers focus on the bad weather–a snowstorm–and on the food served at the banquet. Because the coronation had taken place on Passion Sunday, and the English monarchs were still Catholic, the only meat served at the banquet was fish.

(via bythegods)

unhistorical:

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King, Jr. is assassinated.

The night before his assassination, King delivered his last speech at Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee; popularly known as “I’ve Been to the Mountain”, this speech was made in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike and called upon the United States to ”be true to what you said on paper”. 

At around 6 PM, King was standing on the balcony outside his room at Memphis’  Lorraine Motel when he was struck by a single bullet through the cheek, fired from a pump-action rifle wielded by James Earl Ray, who shortly afterward fled north to Canada. After being taken to the hospital, King was pronounced dead five minutes after 7. All across the United States, violent riots in Baltimore, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and elsewhere broke out during the week following the assassination, though notably not in Indianapolis, where Robert F. Kennedy, who would be assassinated two months later, delivered arguably his speech informing the city’s residents of King’s death.

The funeral, which took place on April 9, was attended by 300,000 people, and a bill to establish a holiday in his honor was presented in Congress not long after. King’s family, and many others besides, maintain that James Earl Ray (a small-time criminal) was the scapegoat of a conspiracy involving the U.S. government and FBI. It is fact that the FBI’s COINTELPRO closely monitored King’s (and other “subversives’) activities intensely often through illegal or dubious means, such as wiretapping and break-ins. The agency also sent King an anonymous letter urging him to commit suicide. In 1999, King’s family won a civil suit in Memphis in which jurors reached the unanimous verdict that “Loyd Jowers [a restaurant owner in 1968] as well as ”others, including governmental agencies’” had been part of a conspiracy to murder King. 

Partial transcript from the 1999 case

Bottom five photographs from LIFE

ancientart:

A quick look at: Acueducto de los Milagros, Mérida, Spain.
This Roman aqueduct was dubbed Acueducto de los Milagros ("Miraculous Aqueduct") by the inhabitants of Mérida for the fact that it was still standing, and for the ewe that it evoked. 
This aqueduct was located in the Roman colony of Emerita Augusta (present day Mérida), which was founded by Augustus Caesar in 25 BC. The construction of the aqueduct itself is thought to have taken place during the 1st century AD, with later construction or renovations occurring around 300 AD. 
The structure was built to supply water to Emerita Augusta. This water was originally brought to the city from Lago de Proserpina -a reservoir which was fed by the Las Pardillas stream, about 5km north-west of Mérida. 38 pillars which stand 25 metres high along some 830 metres remains today. The structure is constructed from opus mixtum. 
The Romans constructed aqueducts to supply water from distant sources to their towns and cities, supplying public baths, private households, etc. Water was moved by the aqueducts through gravity, the aqueducts were built on an ever-so-slight downward gradient. This diagram is useful in showing how Roman aqueducts worked. 
Photo courtesy & taken by Jane Drumsara.

ancientart:

A quick look at: Acueducto de los MilagrosMérida, Spain.

This Roman aqueduct was dubbed Acueducto de los Milagros ("Miraculous Aqueduct") by the inhabitants of Mérida for the fact that it was still standing, and for the ewe that it evoked. 

This aqueduct was located in the Roman colony of Emerita Augusta (present day Mérida), which was founded by Augustus Caesar in 25 BC. The construction of the aqueduct itself is thought to have taken place during the 1st century AD, with later construction or renovations occurring around 300 AD.

The structure was built to supply water to Emerita Augusta. This water was originally brought to the city from Lago de Proserpina -a reservoir which was fed by the Las Pardillas stream, about 5km north-west of Mérida. 38 pillars which stand 25 metres high along some 830 metres remains today. The structure is constructed from opus mixtum

The Romans constructed aqueducts to supply water from distant sources to their towns and cities, supplying public baths, private households, etc. Water was moved by the aqueducts through gravity, the aqueducts were built on an ever-so-slight downward gradient. This diagram is useful in showing how Roman aqueducts worked. 

Photo courtesy & taken by Jane Drumsara.